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20130201
20130228
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
in vermont 1872 admitted to massachusetts bar in 1857, 1898 city counselor, city solicitor. mayor of the city of north hampton. state senator, president of massachusetts senate. 1915 to 1917 governor of the state of massachusetts. and went on to be vice president in 1921 and president in 1923. i've never seen anything like that where somebody had that many jobs leading up to president. >> and he almost never lost. >> how did he do it? >> he told someone running for politics is my hobby. >> one was the republican party and democratic party were different. if you helped the others, they helped you. he was in the party. it was a club. it wasn't to be entirely looked down upon the way we learn in school. he climbed the greasy pole of massachusetts politics. there is some good in the party. they train you and help you work efficiently. but it's also his incredible personal perseverance and that's what i try to get at in the chapter about his time in new hampton mass. that was the county seat. after college he looked around and couldn't afford lawsuit. kind of bugged his father about it. couldn't a
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
a place that's its richard king maps -- redistricting maps. the only african a member of the city council lost his seat. seems like a perfect reason why we need section 5. the only black member lost his district. this stuff happens more often in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. so many different people are urging that section 5 be upheld. host: we have a tweet for you from maverick. guest: well, if they say it needs to be expanded, that would treat state the same. ari keep saying there is more demonstration -- discrimination in cover states and the facts don't bear that out. there's no evidence that states are evading court decrees or otherwise practicing discrimination, and that's what led to passage of section 5. section 2 remains. that was the only objection in the entire state of alabama in the last 12 years. one objection. the entire state should be remain covered under section 5 because of one objection? host: sacramento, california, dj. caller: voting is not a privilege, it is a right. i should not be restricted because of my color in that pursued. you guys never have t
. when you have the most important political city in the country, washington d. c., and the post has been the dominant voice in that city for a long time, members of congress, federal policymakers, whether they want to or not, that is their principal link with print journalism. sure, you get the "times" or the "wall street journal" or the "l. a. times" -- the people, they meet and talk with by that morning, there is the general presumption everybody has read the post. >> everybody has read the post, do they still say that? >> i do not know. probably not. they may very well have glanced at the website, had and look -- had a look at an aggregator. >> how long did you work for the post? >> from 1979 until 1981. >> why did you leave? >> how i went there is kind of fascinating. i had written a couple of op-ed pieces. i had not been in journalism. i was in politics. they approached me and said, would you like to write political editorials for "the washington post?" not knowing any better, i said yes. she said, write a once a week column. so i did that through the campaign of 1980, covering the
district on the city council went in a district 71% african-american to 30% african-american, and the only african-american member of the city council in that city in alabama lost his seat. so that to me seems like a perfect reason why we still need section 5. they drew the district in such a way that it resulted in the on black member of the city council losing his district. yes, this stuff happens in ohio and pennsylvania and wisconsin. but it happens more often, still, in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. and that's why section 5 so many different people across the legal spectrum are urging it be upheld. host: maverick rights in and says, the voting act law should expand to all states after seeing the obvious suppression attempts and tactics in the 2012 election. guest: well, if they are going to say it needs to be expanded, yes, that would then treat states the same. and particularly in terms of the evidence. ari keeps saying that there's more discrimination in covered states. that is simply not true. the facts do not bear that out at all. and if are you going to have sectio
have moved since 2007. a lot of cities have minimum wages that are a lot higher, often because the cost of living is a lot higher. but yes, states have acted unilaterally. they have looked at their industries and they have worked to do it to help low-income families. again, raising the minimum wage is mostly helping low- income families. teens, seniors, and others. host: the states with the lowest minimum wage, alabama, mississippi, tennessee -- they have no minimum wage. wyoming and georgia, $5.15. host: what do you make of those states? some southern states have no minimum wage. guest: i think the thing to remember is that those tend to be low-cost states to live in. that is probably part of this. they also tend to be states with high unemployment rates. generally, they tend to be more conservative. the politics of this is not easy. republicans have tended to resist minimum wage hikes and democrats have. the policy tends to get a bit complicated. host: what do of economists say that are for increasing the minimum wage? guest: economists say you're raising the minimum wage about as muc
.s. embassy in turkey. also there are reports of several people being injured. former new york city mayor ed coach who apparently died as a result of congestive heart failure -- he was 88 years old. at about 8:30, we will examine yesterday's confirmation hearing with a chuckle. for our first 45 minutes, we'll take a look at hillary clinton, almost 1 million miles traveled as she served for a president. we will take a look at her ten- year and to wait how she did. she spent her last day in washington today. call us at -- if you want to send this tweet, do so at @cspanwj. we have had people responding to our question on facebook.com/c- span as well. senator kerrey will be sworn in later on today as well. secretary of state clinton spent her last day as secretary of state. the washington post has this headline -- more analysis in the papers, taking a look at the secretary of state. in our time, we are interested in hearing from you. the numbers -- you can treat us @cspanwj or on facebook. weighing in -- michael hobbs saying -- want to join us on the phone? the numbers will be on the screen. ind
among the free blacks in particular, of raising money for the downtrodden in the city. and during the war she was a volunteer nurse. so what can i tell you? i think she really personified a lot of the things we think of today as the role of the first lady. >> who enjoys the of first lady the most? if you want to use the word "detested," who would you put on that list? >> julia grant. suddenly she had a pedestal to be on and she absolutely adored it. she loved it and try to persuade him to run for a third term. he didn't, she didn't like it. she tells how they got on the train to leave washington and she fell and wept and wept. she claimed her place in later life and would come back in great glory to the white house. i do not know if anyone hated it. mrs. franklin pierce came in under horrible circumstances, having lost two sons. one of the way to the white house. -- one in a train wreck on the way to the white house. she was a pretty good politician and she was as smart lady and was involved in political things that she just did not have the heart for it. at one point she fell in
way tonight in new orleans. alex is joining us next from new york city. caller: my comment is -- i am not particularly a sports fan. it seems very repetitive back and forth. as far as the regulation -- my observation, not just about football but hockey and also even baseball -- people seem to like people getting hit and getting beat up. they even like people looking kind of distorted like when they take drugs. i would be in favor if there could be a lot to prevent head injuries or young people being persuaded to do drugs to get onto teams or whatever. it is my commentary to my fellow americans the sunday morning that, it is like gladiatorial combat. . "the hunter games." it is almost like a freak show you enjoy watching human suffering. that is my cheery comment. host: thank you for the call. on the twitter page, there is this. back in 2009, tiki barber testified on the issue of head injuries at the high school and professional lover -- level. [video clip] >> you hear the file but comes from people who think the nfl is not addressing this issue. at the end of the day, it is a player p
. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved 112 private schools in the program, nearly 5000 students. $6,500 per student. the total cost, i assume annual, 164 -- $154 million. >> it depends on how you look at it. milwaukee past its first voucher program in 1989. it served as a model for a lot of other state voucher programs across the country. it serves over 24,000 students. there was a study that came out a couple years ago by the state that found vouchers were performing at the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. a more recent study out of the university of arkansas showed positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown to offer pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates, but the milwaukee voucher program has been held up as the model, and the opinions of it will break down exactly along the lines of a voucher programs all over. clearly, governor walker believes if parents are buying into this program and it is proving popular, it will prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. we will see if the legislature is
that wisconsin is a state and that there are cities inside of it. if i say i like wisconsin there are a whole bunch of interest that passed it off of that. he need to understand that hierarchy of objects. you also need to understand how they relate to each other. >> does this personalization become complementary to search, does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide you with information. there's also a very powerful social component because we can show you interests you may have in common with peo
. host: you cannot find a minimum wage job? caller: jobs in my city are very hard to come by unless you know exactly where to look. i have three scholarships. i'm trying to get a job on campus to help pay my debt. jobs are in very high demand. it is difficult. i am trying. hopefully, with the president's new policies, this could be more of an easy process. host: what is the minimum wage in oregon? caller: it was recently raised by our governor to $8.95. i cannot be certain about that. i've only read one article. host: i know there are websites out there that look at the minimum wage across the states. here's the new york times -- different economic arguments for minimum-wage, something that surely will be debated in the days after last night's state of the union address. on twitter -- let's go to brian in maryland, democrat. caller: good morning. president obama's speech was refreshing. as a proud member of the u.s. armed services that served our country more than 20 years, but we are focusing on domestic agendas and trying to invest money right here in the united. united so that was ve
which are weapons of war, which don't belong in the neighborhoods of our cities and towns and high capacity ammunition whose only purpose is to kill a great number of people in a very short period of time. we have these very reasonable commonsense solutions which are available. last night at the president's state of the union, we had 30 victims who suffered the grievous impact of gun violence. who put a face on the devastation, the scourge of gun violence in this country. we owe it to them, we owe it to families all across this country to move on this legislation, to hold a vote, up or down, so woo can take what most americans support, responsible gun safety legislation to reduce gun violence in our country. when the gentlelady was just going through the examples of what the n.r.a. has been successful in doing, let's not forget, the n.r.a. doesn't have a vote in this chamber. so every single one of those actions happened because individuals in congress voted for them. they should be accountable for that. we could fix it by taking votes today to enhance public safety to impose reaso
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
that president obama traveled back to chicago and a city on track to become of the murder capital of the united states -- again that is "the national journal". this shows the line graph from january 12 -- january 2012 if -- go by the fbi's estimates at a time approaching two hundred 50. that is followed by new york, baltimore, and philadelphia. detroit and los angeles being charted there as well. your thoughts for the next 40 minutes. mark on the democrats' line, what do you think? caller: i agree with the second amendment that we all have the right to bear arms. when it comes to these assault weapons, there are too many shootings with the schools. it has become almost an every day thing. it is creating a panic. i know certain areas are worse than others. the government has a compelling interest to address this. they need to try to put rules on the table, not to take away the second amendment, but to enforce more rules to negate these happenings. host: the president several times reiterating that the proposal deserves a vote. what he think? caller: i agree. congress is our lawmakers. they put t
a few years ago i found myself sitting next to the mayor of salt lake city and he was a nice guy and we started talking about what i do for a living and i told him i work to encourage young women and girls to run for a political office. why, he said? which stumps me because in my world, the question of why we need more women, is not a question but how do we get more women there. he went on to say i have two daughters, i have a wife, i have a more, he said, i know what women need and what can women do in office that i can't do? and it was an interesting question and he had no idea what a can of worms he was opening by getting into this conversation with me because i really believe no matter how well intentioned a man in office is, his decisions are never going to be as strong if you have men and women legislating together. i'm happy to say in the years i started doing this work is the world has come around to this idea, the idea is we need to add women to leadership, not because it's fair or it's the right thing to do but because adding more women to leadership is going to make stronger
and our villages and our cities across this country are all full -- are all full. i would love to have president obama interact more and let's stop having suspensions. they say we will not deal with the budget crisis now. we will wait until march to handle things. that is not the way that we can handle this country right now. all american taxpayers are having our own fiscal cliff problems and that cannot be no more. our taxes are going up, our property taxes and food taxes and any kind of hikes of taxes is a challenge for the american workers. host: thanks for your call. guest: i think the sentiment that obama should roll up his sleeves and get to work with congress is one that many members of congress actually would agree with including democrats. he has a little reputation of not reaching out to and interacting with members of congress and a way that hurts his agenda on the hill. at the same time, one chamber has not done a budget for four years and that is the senate and they decided politically it does not make sense and now they have changed that and they will do it. host: what ab
been, we have a devastating level of youth unemployment in cities like yours. let's focus on that because we love and care for people. we do what is good and political but may not be honest economics. host: current federal minimum wage is $7.25. bob in chesapeake, virginia, independent line. caller: representative, the minimum-wage is used as a political football. i think would be a good thing if we would set the minimum wage on all of the jobs in the country as a national need and a global competitive need instead of letting the minimum wage be brought up every so often as a political football. they need to set the minimum wage on all the jobs. then they can eliminate the union hassles and we can be more globally competitive. guest: you are correct it is used as a political football to get you some wonderful movement on your political base. if we were to think like an economist, you would not have a minimum wage. you would allow the market to generate those wages. if you're going to move to a minimum wage, are you going to have the training wage and for those folks who ar
-- city but they threw it aside when he opened the country of and now has become -- now has become a capitalist haven. they talk a great we about to this, but it is all about preserving the party's power economically as the country continues to grow, because they threw aside most aspects of communism to a great time ago. north korea is all about preserving the power of the military and the kim dynasty. again, it really has nothing to do with what karl marx it visited as communism way back. someone could do a fascinating book about how and a move to agent it diverged. it is an absolutely fascinating split that occurred. >> harvard fellow keith richard burke of 34 years of reporting and insights from around the world. next sunday at 8:00 on c-span q&a. >> next, your calls and comments. live at 2:00, c-span begins its new series. first ladies, influence and image with a discussion about the influence of women who served as the first lady. >> what worries me is i do not want to be sitting in the same place i was a couple of years ago going to the government to say can we have more spec
adn from new york city steve mcmahan. thank you to both of the. as we look at the state of the union, what do you think about the tone? what about the term of the president's delivery ended the way he was saying his message? guest: i think he did what many presidents do in the state of the union address, he laid out an agenda for the future. those things tend to be kind of a list. then he built to a crescendo at the end on having a vote on the gun-control measures that he has introduced. i thought it was a terrific state of the union address that did lay out the agenda. republicans know what it is he would like to accomplish. american people know what is at stake. now we will see if congress is willing to act. guest: you had the inaugural and the state of the union. he laid out a pretty aggressive liberal agenda. obviously there will be some differences of opinion that emerge out of this. whether it be the debt ceiling, the sequester, the continuing resolution of getting the budget, the sequence of things the speech set up in terms of the beginning of this course. having said that, i
, the city to hold 10% your entire working life for your retirement. between jobs and layoffs -- and i have always been fortunate to make as much as college graduates, but between the jobs and layoffs throughout my work life and the clinton era taxes and everything -- i'm not blaming him, i thought he was a good president even though i am a republican, i just want someone's opinion on people my age and why we have so little put away. we are the generation of all the crises and the tail end of that . host: before we get a response from paul taylor, are you still with us? caller: >> i am. host: what has your savings patterns been over the last couple years? caller: i had to quit contributing to my 401k's just to get by with the rising cost of living from 2006 to present i went four years without a pay increase from my employers because they were in a financial struggle as well with the economic hit in 2007 and slow growth to 2009. we finally got a pay increase last year because of somewhat of a comeback in our industry. host: thank you. that age group is critical when it comes to your 401k pl
, but i was wondering how risky it might be to have a city -- a sitting president working for or raising money for a 501c4. >> i have not attempted to separate my comments -- i do represent organizing for action, which is the name of the organization you are referring to. i would simply say as you know, i will not be involved in electoral activity at all. to bet sense, it's not confused with activity in an election cycle, the types of concerns the campaign finance sector we're talking about here today. as you know, it is devoted to federal and state public policy and issue development advocacy. it will be operating therefore as a social welfare organization. without going into tremendous amount of discussion about people's views of the feasibility of such an enterprise, i would say this -- the business of communicating on issues in this country and involving one's self in the day- to-day business of grass-roots requires resources. the largest issue we all face is in a country of this size and complexity and even with developments like internet communications which have reduced the cost o
're they organized into hierarchies? for example, you need to know wisconsin is a state in their cities from there. if i say i like wisconsin, there are a whole bunch of interests that cascade off of that. you need to understand the hierarchy of objects. you also need to be able to understand how they relate to each other, synonyms, duplication. >> does this personalization large internet companies has you have to understand what the ontology of entities is. does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide
these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for all americans. i was debating whether it should be johnson or jimmy carter. jimmy carter, in the final history of this country is written, jimmy carter will be among the best up there, not ronald reagan. look what jimmy carter did, by holding to signing treaties with panama, he gave the panama canal back to the panamanians. george bush's father arrested noriega and put him in jail. thank you. host: the washington post editorial page weighs in on the question -- who gets the washington post this morning on past presidents. iowa, democratic caller, lisa. caller: good morning. president roosevelt. he was the first president i can rememberhcane helped elderly people who did not have anything. i think he started social security. he had a disability, but it did not stop him from being the best president we ever had and never will. host: what would your parents etc. this question? >> they would've said the same thing if they were alive
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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